advertisement

Q & A Library


Print this page | Sign up for free e-bulletins
 | Bookmark This Page

Q
No Turkey for Thanksgiving?

My sister has become a vegetarian. What can I include in Thanksgiving dinner that she can eat? She's avoiding dairy products as well as meat... including turkey!

A
Answer (Published 11/20/2006)

By making this choice, your sister will probably lower her risks of high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes, obesity, heart disease, and cancer. And by accommodating her new way of eating at your Thanksgiving dinner, you and your family may realize what a delicious (as well as healthy) alternative she has chosen.

Related Weil Products
Dr. Weil on Healthy Aging for Healthy Eating - Dr. Weil on Healthy Aging for Nutrition - Want to change your diet? The Dr. Weil on Healthy Aging online guide is your anti-inflammatory diet headquarters. Start your free trial and get access to an exclusive version of Dr. Weil's Anti-Inflammatory Food Pyramid, hundreds of recipes, eating guides, and more.

You can get a substitute for turkey made with tofu and tempeh. One brand, Tofurky, comes complete with giblet gravy and stuffing. Another, UnTurkey, comes in more than one size so you can get a soy "turkey" big enough to serve your sister and any other guests who want to try it. Both are quite good, with crispy "skin" and all.

You could also stuff a pumpkin or squash with rice, cranberries, apples, nuts and other ingredients that typically go into turkey stuffing. A stuffed pumpkin looks very festive on the table and will rival the turkey for attention.

Since your sister isn't eating dairy products, you also might want to offer vegan versions of some traditional Thanksgiving side-dishes such as sweet potatoes and mashed potatoes. Cooked pureed cauliflower is an example. You might also want to try roasted root vegetables as a replacement for stuffing. Instead of butter, use olive oil to flavor green vegetables. Or check my book "The Healthy Kitchen." You'll find lots of recipes for side dishes that are as tasty and appealing as traditional Thanksgiving fare. Your family and guests may like them so much that they'll thank your sister - and you! - for introducing them to a new, healthy and delicious way of eating.

Happy Thanksgiving!

Andrew Weil, M.D.

Creative Commons License Some Rights Reserved Creative Commons Copyright Notice
A portion of the original material created by Weil Lifestyle on DrWeil.com (specifically, all question and answer-type articles in the Dr. Weil Q&A Library) is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License.

Q
No Turkey for Thanksgiving?

My sister has become a vegetarian. What can I include in Thanksgiving dinner that she can eat? She's avoiding dairy products as well as meat... including turkey!

A
Answer (Published 11/20/2006)

By making this choice, your sister will probably lower her risks of high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes, obesity, heart disease, and cancer. And by accommodating her new way of eating at your Thanksgiving dinner, you and your family may realize what a delicious (as well as healthy) alternative she has chosen.

Related Weil Products
Dr. Weil on Healthy Aging for Healthy Eating - Dr. Weil on Healthy Aging for Nutrition - Want to change your diet? The Dr. Weil on Healthy Aging online guide is your anti-inflammatory diet headquarters. Start your free trial and get access to an exclusive version of Dr. Weil's Anti-Inflammatory Food Pyramid, hundreds of recipes, eating guides, and more.

You can get a substitute for turkey made with tofu and tempeh. One brand, Tofurky, comes complete with giblet gravy and stuffing. Another, UnTurkey, comes in more than one size so you can get a soy "turkey" big enough to serve your sister and any other guests who want to try it. Both are quite good, with crispy "skin" and all.

You could also stuff a pumpkin or squash with rice, cranberries, apples, nuts and other ingredients that typically go into turkey stuffing. A stuffed pumpkin looks very festive on the table and will rival the turkey for attention.

Since your sister isn't eating dairy products, you also might want to offer vegan versions of some traditional Thanksgiving side-dishes such as sweet potatoes and mashed potatoes. Cooked pureed cauliflower is an example. You might also want to try roasted root vegetables as a replacement for stuffing. Instead of butter, use olive oil to flavor green vegetables. Or check my book "The Healthy Kitchen." You'll find lots of recipes for side dishes that are as tasty and appealing as traditional Thanksgiving fare. Your family and guests may like them so much that they'll thank your sister - and you! - for introducing them to a new, healthy and delicious way of eating.

Happy Thanksgiving!

Andrew Weil, M.D.

Creative Commons License Some Rights Reserved Creative Commons Copyright Notice
A portion of the original material created by Weil Lifestyle on DrWeil.com (specifically, all question and answer-type articles in the Dr. Weil Q&A Library) is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License.

The Weil Vitamin Advisor
Get your FREE personalized vitamin recommendation & supplement plan today!

Dr. Weil on Healthy Aging
Follow Dr. Weil's Anti-Inflammatory Diet and save 30%. Start your 14-day free trial now!

Stay Connected with Dr. Weil
Promote the health of your body, mind and spirit - sign up for Dr. Weil's FREE newsletters today!

Vitamin Library
Supplement your knowledge with Dr. Weil's essential vitamin facts. Learn why they are necessary and more.

Dr. Weil's Head-to-Toe Wellness Guide
Your guide to natural health.
Use the Wellness Guide today!

Dr. Weil's Anti-Inflammatory Diet Food Pyramid
Our interactive tool can help improve overall health through diet.

 
Copyright © 2016 Weil Lifestyle
Information on this web site is provided for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for the advice provided by your physician or other healthcare professional. You should not use the information on this web site for diagnosing or treating a health problem or disease, or prescribing any medication or other treatment.

Ad Choice
Advertising Notice

This Site and third parties who place advertisements on this Site may collect and use information about your visits to this Site and other websites in order to provide advertisements about goods and services of interest to you. If you would like to obtain more information about these advertising practices and to make choices about online behavioral advertising, please click here

  

Q & A Library



Q
No Turkey for Thanksgiving?

My sister has become a vegetarian. What can I include in Thanksgiving dinner that she can eat? She's avoiding dairy products as well as meat... including turkey!

A
Answer (Published 11/20/2006)

By making this choice, your sister will probably lower her risks of high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes, obesity, heart disease, and cancer. And by accommodating her new way of eating at your Thanksgiving dinner, you and your family may realize what a delicious (as well as healthy) alternative she has chosen.

Related Weil Products
Dr. Weil on Healthy Aging for Healthy Eating - Dr. Weil on Healthy Aging for Nutrition - Want to change your diet? The Dr. Weil on Healthy Aging online guide is your anti-inflammatory diet headquarters. Start your free trial and get access to an exclusive version of Dr. Weil's Anti-Inflammatory Food Pyramid, hundreds of recipes, eating guides, and more.

You can get a substitute for turkey made with tofu and tempeh. One brand, Tofurky, comes complete with giblet gravy and stuffing. Another, UnTurkey, comes in more than one size so you can get a soy "turkey" big enough to serve your sister and any other guests who want to try it. Both are quite good, with crispy "skin" and all.

You could also stuff a pumpkin or squash with rice, cranberries, apples, nuts and other ingredients that typically go into turkey stuffing. A stuffed pumpkin looks very festive on the table and will rival the turkey for attention.

Since your sister isn't eating dairy products, you also might want to offer vegan versions of some traditional Thanksgiving side-dishes such as sweet potatoes and mashed potatoes. Cooked pureed cauliflower is an example. You might also want to try roasted root vegetables as a replacement for stuffing. Instead of butter, use olive oil to flavor green vegetables. Or check my book "The Healthy Kitchen." You'll find lots of recipes for side dishes that are as tasty and appealing as traditional Thanksgiving fare. Your family and guests may like them so much that they'll thank your sister - and you! - for introducing them to a new, healthy and delicious way of eating.

Happy Thanksgiving!

Andrew Weil, M.D.

Creative Commons License Some Rights Reserved Creative Commons Copyright Notice
A portion of the original material created by Weil Lifestyle on DrWeil.com (specifically, all question and answer-type articles in the Dr. Weil Q&A Library) is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License.

Q
No Turkey for Thanksgiving?

My sister has become a vegetarian. What can I include in Thanksgiving dinner that she can eat? She's avoiding dairy products as well as meat... including turkey!

A
Answer (Published 11/20/2006)

By making this choice, your sister will probably lower her risks of high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes, obesity, heart disease, and cancer. And by accommodating her new way of eating at your Thanksgiving dinner, you and your family may realize what a delicious (as well as healthy) alternative she has chosen.

Related Weil Products
Dr. Weil on Healthy Aging for Healthy Eating - Dr. Weil on Healthy Aging for Nutrition - Want to change your diet? The Dr. Weil on Healthy Aging online guide is your anti-inflammatory diet headquarters. Start your free trial and get access to an exclusive version of Dr. Weil's Anti-Inflammatory Food Pyramid, hundreds of recipes, eating guides, and more.

You can get a substitute for turkey made with tofu and tempeh. One brand, Tofurky, comes complete with giblet gravy and stuffing. Another, UnTurkey, comes in more than one size so you can get a soy "turkey" big enough to serve your sister and any other guests who want to try it. Both are quite good, with crispy "skin" and all.

You could also stuff a pumpkin or squash with rice, cranberries, apples, nuts and other ingredients that typically go into turkey stuffing. A stuffed pumpkin looks very festive on the table and will rival the turkey for attention.

Since your sister isn't eating dairy products, you also might want to offer vegan versions of some traditional Thanksgiving side-dishes such as sweet potatoes and mashed potatoes. Cooked pureed cauliflower is an example. You might also want to try roasted root vegetables as a replacement for stuffing. Instead of butter, use olive oil to flavor green vegetables. Or check my book "The Healthy Kitchen." You'll find lots of recipes for side dishes that are as tasty and appealing as traditional Thanksgiving fare. Your family and guests may like them so much that they'll thank your sister - and you! - for introducing them to a new, healthy and delicious way of eating.

Happy Thanksgiving!

Andrew Weil, M.D.

Creative Commons License Some Rights Reserved Creative Commons Copyright Notice
A portion of the original material created by Weil Lifestyle on DrWeil.com (specifically, all question and answer-type articles in the Dr. Weil Q&A Library) is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License.