advertisement

Q & A Library


Print this page | Sign up for free e-bulletins
 | Bookmark This Page

Q
Finding Lung Cancer Faster?
What do you think of CT scans to screen for lung cancer?
A
Answer (Published 10/30/2003)

Updated on 7/29/2005

If a CT (computerized tomography) scan can find lung cancer at an early stage when it can be successfully treated, it would be worthwhile for people at high risk. Researchers at Mt. Sinai School of Medicine in New York City announced results of part of the Early Lung Cancer Action Project (ELCAP), which was initiated to investigate whether a low-dose CT scan would be cost-effective for high-risk patients - smokers and former smokers. Participants in the study were people age 60 and older who smoked at least one pack of cigarettes per day for 10 years or two packs a day for five years.

Related Weil Products
The Weil Vitamin Advisor for Your Body - Foods, herbs and drugs can all interact, sometimes in unexpected ways. The Weil Vitamin Advisor takes known interactions into account when developing recommendations, to help safeguard against adverse effects. Get your free, personalized Weil Vitamin Advisor recommendation today. Start now!

The researchers found that 80 percent of the cancers detected were small, "stage one" tumors (the earliest detectable stage). With this information they calculated that CT screenings of those at high risk for lung cancer would be cost-efficient and would increase survival. Results were published in August 2003 issue of the medical journal Chest.

CT scans provide a detailed picture of the lungs and involve a radiation dose that is only slightly higher than that from a single chest x-ray. The scan takes 20 seconds. The fact that these scans may improve diagnosis and the prospect for successful treatment doesn't diminish the fact that if you're at risk of lung cancer because you smoke, the best thing you can do for yourself is stop. Now.

Andrew Weil, M.D.

Creative Commons License Some Rights Reserved Creative Commons Copyright Notice
A portion of the original material created by Weil Lifestyle on DrWeil.com (specifically, all question and answer-type articles in the Dr. Weil Q&A Library) is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License.

The Weil Vitamin Advisor
Get your FREE personalized vitamin recommendation & supplement plan today!

Dr. Weil on Healthy Aging
Follow Dr. Weil's Anti-Inflammatory Diet and save 30%. Start your 14-day free trial now!

Stay Connected with Dr. Weil
Promote the health of your body, mind and spirit - sign up for Dr. Weil's FREE newsletters today!

Vitamin Library
Supplement your knowledge with Dr. Weil's essential vitamin facts. Learn why they are necessary and more.

Dr. Weil's Head-to-Toe Wellness Guide
Your guide to natural health.
Use the Wellness Guide today!

Dr. Weil's Anti-Inflammatory Diet Food Pyramid
Our interactive tool can help improve overall health through diet.

 
Copyright © 2016 Weil Lifestyle
Information on this web site is provided for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for the advice provided by your physician or other healthcare professional. You should not use the information on this web site for diagnosing or treating a health problem or disease, or prescribing any medication or other treatment.

Ad Choice
Advertising Notice

This Site and third parties who place advertisements on this Site may collect and use information about your visits to this Site and other websites in order to provide advertisements about goods and services of interest to you. If you would like to obtain more information about these advertising practices and to make choices about online behavioral advertising, please click here

  

Q & A Library



Q
Finding Lung Cancer Faster?
What do you think of CT scans to screen for lung cancer?
A
Answer (Published 10/30/2003)

Updated on 7/29/2005

If a CT (computerized tomography) scan can find lung cancer at an early stage when it can be successfully treated, it would be worthwhile for people at high risk. Researchers at Mt. Sinai School of Medicine in New York City announced results of part of the Early Lung Cancer Action Project (ELCAP), which was initiated to investigate whether a low-dose CT scan would be cost-effective for high-risk patients - smokers and former smokers. Participants in the study were people age 60 and older who smoked at least one pack of cigarettes per day for 10 years or two packs a day for five years.

Related Weil Products
The Weil Vitamin Advisor for Your Body - Foods, herbs and drugs can all interact, sometimes in unexpected ways. The Weil Vitamin Advisor takes known interactions into account when developing recommendations, to help safeguard against adverse effects. Get your free, personalized Weil Vitamin Advisor recommendation today. Start now!

The researchers found that 80 percent of the cancers detected were small, "stage one" tumors (the earliest detectable stage). With this information they calculated that CT screenings of those at high risk for lung cancer would be cost-efficient and would increase survival. Results were published in August 2003 issue of the medical journal Chest.

CT scans provide a detailed picture of the lungs and involve a radiation dose that is only slightly higher than that from a single chest x-ray. The scan takes 20 seconds. The fact that these scans may improve diagnosis and the prospect for successful treatment doesn't diminish the fact that if you're at risk of lung cancer because you smoke, the best thing you can do for yourself is stop. Now.

Andrew Weil, M.D.

Creative Commons License Some Rights Reserved Creative Commons Copyright Notice
A portion of the original material created by Weil Lifestyle on DrWeil.com (specifically, all question and answer-type articles in the Dr. Weil Q&A Library) is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License.

Related Topics