advertisement

Q & A Library


Print this page | Sign up for free e-bulletins
 | Bookmark This Page

Q
Rethinking Fluoride?

What do you think about the government's decision to lower fluoride levels in water? Do you still support fluoridation, or are you concerned about the possible danger of bone cancer in young boys?

A
Answer (Published 7/17/2015)

Originally published November, 2009. Updated July, 2015.

In April of this year (2015) the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) recommended lowering the levels of fluoride in drinking water, the first change it has suggested since 1962. The new recommended limit is 0.7 milligrams (mg) of fluoride per liter of water, down from the previous range of 0.7 to 1.2 mg per liter. The rationale for the change is that we now have many more sources of fluoride than were available in 1962, including fluoridated toothpaste, mouth rinses and sealants.

Related Weil Products
Dr. Weil on Healthy Aging - Your Online Guide to the Anti-Inflammatory Diet! - Everything you need to get started eating a healthful, satisfying diet is here - including eating and shopping guides, over 300 recipes, and an exclusive version of Dr. Weil's Anti-Inflammatory Food Pyramid! Start your 14-day free trial now - and start eating anti-inflammatory today!

In addition, the HHS recommendation was made to counter an increased incidence in white spots on tooth enamel caused by fluoridation, a risk I've written about on this site in response to earlier questions. Known as fluorosis, this spotting occurs only in children eight years old and younger as a result of too much fluoride intake while permanent teeth are developing under the gums. To prevent it, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends using an alternative source of water for children aged 8 years and younger if your primary drinking water contains greater than 2 mg/L of fluoride. You may be able to find out how much fluoride is in your drinking water by accessing the CDC site "My Water's Fluoride"

Most states provide information to this site on fluoride levels in their drinking water, but some do not. The CDC also recommends avoiding fluoridated toothpaste in children under age two and using only a pea-sized amount for kids between the age of 2 and 6. Also, instruct little kids to spit out toothpaste rather than swallow it, as young children are inclined to do.

Overall, fluoridation of community water supplies has been a tremendous success, having dramatically reduced tooth decay in both children and adults.

As for bone cancer, every year about 400 children and adolescents (boys and girls) in the U.S. are diagnosed with osteosarcoma, a rare disease. In 2006, Harvard researchers reported an association between fluoride in drinking water and the incidence of osteosarcoma in boys (not girls).

In a review of the more recent research, the American Cancer Society noted that the second part of the Harvard study, published in 2011, compared the fluoride levels in bones near tumors in people with osteosarcoma to levels in people with other types of bone tumors. No difference was seen between the fluoride levels in the two groups.

According to the ACS, two more recent studies compared the rates of osteosarcoma in areas with higher versus lower levels of fluoridation in Ireland and the United States. Neither one found an increased risk of the disease in areas with fluoridated water.

While this case isn't closed, so far we have no hard evidence supporting a link between fluoridation and bone cancer.

Andrew Weil, M.D.

Sources:
"Water Fluoridation and Cancer Risk," American Cancer Society, accessed April 28, 2014, http://www.cancer.org/cancer/cancercauses/othercarcinogens/athome/water-fluoridation-and-cancer-risk

"HHS issues final recommendation for community water fluoridation," U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, accessed April 28, 2015, http://www.hhs.gov/news/press/2015pres/04/20150427a.html

Creative Commons License Some Rights Reserved Creative Commons Copyright Notice
A portion of the original material created by Weil Lifestyle on DrWeil.com (specifically, all question and answer-type articles in the Dr. Weil Q&A Library) is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License.

Q
Rethinking Fluoride?

What do you think about the government's decision to lower fluoride levels in water? Do you still support fluoridation, or are you concerned about the possible danger of bone cancer in young boys?

A
Answer (Published 7/17/2015)

Originally published November, 2009. Updated July, 2015.

In April of this year (2015) the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) recommended lowering the levels of fluoride in drinking water, the first change it has suggested since 1962. The new recommended limit is 0.7 milligrams (mg) of fluoride per liter of water, down from the previous range of 0.7 to 1.2 mg per liter. The rationale for the change is that we now have many more sources of fluoride than were available in 1962, including fluoridated toothpaste, mouth rinses and sealants.

Related Weil Products
Dr. Weil on Healthy Aging - Your Online Guide to the Anti-Inflammatory Diet! - Everything you need to get started eating a healthful, satisfying diet is here - including eating and shopping guides, over 300 recipes, and an exclusive version of Dr. Weil's Anti-Inflammatory Food Pyramid! Start your 14-day free trial now - and start eating anti-inflammatory today!

In addition, the HHS recommendation was made to counter an increased incidence in white spots on tooth enamel caused by fluoridation, a risk I've written about on this site in response to earlier questions. Known as fluorosis, this spotting occurs only in children eight years old and younger as a result of too much fluoride intake while permanent teeth are developing under the gums. To prevent it, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends using an alternative source of water for children aged 8 years and younger if your primary drinking water contains greater than 2 mg/L of fluoride. You may be able to find out how much fluoride is in your drinking water by accessing the CDC site "My Water's Fluoride"

Most states provide information to this site on fluoride levels in their drinking water, but some do not. The CDC also recommends avoiding fluoridated toothpaste in children under age two and using only a pea-sized amount for kids between the age of 2 and 6. Also, instruct little kids to spit out toothpaste rather than swallow it, as young children are inclined to do.

Overall, fluoridation of community water supplies has been a tremendous success, having dramatically reduced tooth decay in both children and adults.

As for bone cancer, every year about 400 children and adolescents (boys and girls) in the U.S. are diagnosed with osteosarcoma, a rare disease. In 2006, Harvard researchers reported an association between fluoride in drinking water and the incidence of osteosarcoma in boys (not girls).

In a review of the more recent research, the American Cancer Society noted that the second part of the Harvard study, published in 2011, compared the fluoride levels in bones near tumors in people with osteosarcoma to levels in people with other types of bone tumors. No difference was seen between the fluoride levels in the two groups.

According to the ACS, two more recent studies compared the rates of osteosarcoma in areas with higher versus lower levels of fluoridation in Ireland and the United States. Neither one found an increased risk of the disease in areas with fluoridated water.

While this case isn't closed, so far we have no hard evidence supporting a link between fluoridation and bone cancer.

Andrew Weil, M.D.

Sources:
"Water Fluoridation and Cancer Risk," American Cancer Society, accessed April 28, 2014, http://www.cancer.org/cancer/cancercauses/othercarcinogens/athome/water-fluoridation-and-cancer-risk

"HHS issues final recommendation for community water fluoridation," U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, accessed April 28, 2015, http://www.hhs.gov/news/press/2015pres/04/20150427a.html

Creative Commons License Some Rights Reserved Creative Commons Copyright Notice
A portion of the original material created by Weil Lifestyle on DrWeil.com (specifically, all question and answer-type articles in the Dr. Weil Q&A Library) is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License.

The Weil Vitamin Advisor
Get your FREE personalized vitamin recommendation & supplement plan today!

Dr. Weil on Healthy Aging
Your Online Guide to the Anti-Inflammatory Diet. Start eating for your health - begin your free trial now.

Dr. Weil's Spontaneous Happiness
Achieve emotional well-being in just eight weeks! Start your 10-day free trial now!

Vitamin Library
Supplement your knowledge with Dr. Weil's essential vitamin facts. Learn why they are necessary and more.

Dr. Weil's Optimum Health Plan
Your 8-week plan to wellness.
Begin your journey today!
 

Dr. Weil's Head-to-Toe Wellness Guide
Your guide to natural health.
Use the Wellness Guide today!

Dr. Weil's Anti-Inflammatory Diet Food Pyramid
Our interactive tool can help improve overall health through diet.

Condition Care Guide
Learn about health conditions from acne to vertigo, and Dr. Weil's view of the best treatment options for each.

Healthy Recipes
Discover a treasure trove of healthy, healing foods and creative, delicious ways to prepare them.

Q&A Library
Over 2,000 questions from you and their corresponding answers from Dr. Weil.

 
Copyright © 2015 Weil Lifestyle
Information on this web site is provided for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for the advice provided by your physician or other healthcare professional. You should not use the information on this web site for diagnosing or treating a health problem or disease, or prescribing any medication or other treatment.

Ad Choice
Advertising Notice

This Site and third parties who place advertisements on this Site may collect and use information about your visits to this Site and other websites in order to provide advertisements about goods and services of interest to you. If you would like to obtain more information about these advertising practices and to make choices about online behavioral advertising, please click here

  

Q & A Library



Q
Rethinking Fluoride?

What do you think about the government's decision to lower fluoride levels in water? Do you still support fluoridation, or are you concerned about the possible danger of bone cancer in young boys?

A
Answer (Published 7/17/2015)

Originally published November, 2009. Updated July, 2015.

In April of this year (2015) the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) recommended lowering the levels of fluoride in drinking water, the first change it has suggested since 1962. The new recommended limit is 0.7 milligrams (mg) of fluoride per liter of water, down from the previous range of 0.7 to 1.2 mg per liter. The rationale for the change is that we now have many more sources of fluoride than were available in 1962, including fluoridated toothpaste, mouth rinses and sealants.

Related Weil Products
Dr. Weil on Healthy Aging - Your Online Guide to the Anti-Inflammatory Diet! - Everything you need to get started eating a healthful, satisfying diet is here - including eating and shopping guides, over 300 recipes, and an exclusive version of Dr. Weil's Anti-Inflammatory Food Pyramid! Start your 14-day free trial now - and start eating anti-inflammatory today!

In addition, the HHS recommendation was made to counter an increased incidence in white spots on tooth enamel caused by fluoridation, a risk I've written about on this site in response to earlier questions. Known as fluorosis, this spotting occurs only in children eight years old and younger as a result of too much fluoride intake while permanent teeth are developing under the gums. To prevent it, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends using an alternative source of water for children aged 8 years and younger if your primary drinking water contains greater than 2 mg/L of fluoride. You may be able to find out how much fluoride is in your drinking water by accessing the CDC site "My Water's Fluoride"

Most states provide information to this site on fluoride levels in their drinking water, but some do not. The CDC also recommends avoiding fluoridated toothpaste in children under age two and using only a pea-sized amount for kids between the age of 2 and 6. Also, instruct little kids to spit out toothpaste rather than swallow it, as young children are inclined to do.

Overall, fluoridation of community water supplies has been a tremendous success, having dramatically reduced tooth decay in both children and adults.

As for bone cancer, every year about 400 children and adolescents (boys and girls) in the U.S. are diagnosed with osteosarcoma, a rare disease. In 2006, Harvard researchers reported an association between fluoride in drinking water and the incidence of osteosarcoma in boys (not girls).

In a review of the more recent research, the American Cancer Society noted that the second part of the Harvard study, published in 2011, compared the fluoride levels in bones near tumors in people with osteosarcoma to levels in people with other types of bone tumors. No difference was seen between the fluoride levels in the two groups.

According to the ACS, two more recent studies compared the rates of osteosarcoma in areas with higher versus lower levels of fluoridation in Ireland and the United States. Neither one found an increased risk of the disease in areas with fluoridated water.

While this case isn't closed, so far we have no hard evidence supporting a link between fluoridation and bone cancer.

Andrew Weil, M.D.

Sources:
"Water Fluoridation and Cancer Risk," American Cancer Society, accessed April 28, 2014, http://www.cancer.org/cancer/cancercauses/othercarcinogens/athome/water-fluoridation-and-cancer-risk

"HHS issues final recommendation for community water fluoridation," U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, accessed April 28, 2015, http://www.hhs.gov/news/press/2015pres/04/20150427a.html

Creative Commons License Some Rights Reserved Creative Commons Copyright Notice
A portion of the original material created by Weil Lifestyle on DrWeil.com (specifically, all question and answer-type articles in the Dr. Weil Q&A Library) is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License.

Q
Rethinking Fluoride?

What do you think about the government's decision to lower fluoride levels in water? Do you still support fluoridation, or are you concerned about the possible danger of bone cancer in young boys?

A
Answer (Published 7/17/2015)

Originally published November, 2009. Updated July, 2015.

In April of this year (2015) the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) recommended lowering the levels of fluoride in drinking water, the first change it has suggested since 1962. The new recommended limit is 0.7 milligrams (mg) of fluoride per liter of water, down from the previous range of 0.7 to 1.2 mg per liter. The rationale for the change is that we now have many more sources of fluoride than were available in 1962, including fluoridated toothpaste, mouth rinses and sealants.

Related Weil Products
Dr. Weil on Healthy Aging - Your Online Guide to the Anti-Inflammatory Diet! - Everything you need to get started eating a healthful, satisfying diet is here - including eating and shopping guides, over 300 recipes, and an exclusive version of Dr. Weil's Anti-Inflammatory Food Pyramid! Start your 14-day free trial now - and start eating anti-inflammatory today!

In addition, the HHS recommendation was made to counter an increased incidence in white spots on tooth enamel caused by fluoridation, a risk I've written about on this site in response to earlier questions. Known as fluorosis, this spotting occurs only in children eight years old and younger as a result of too much fluoride intake while permanent teeth are developing under the gums. To prevent it, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends using an alternative source of water for children aged 8 years and younger if your primary drinking water contains greater than 2 mg/L of fluoride. You may be able to find out how much fluoride is in your drinking water by accessing the CDC site "My Water's Fluoride"

Most states provide information to this site on fluoride levels in their drinking water, but some do not. The CDC also recommends avoiding fluoridated toothpaste in children under age two and using only a pea-sized amount for kids between the age of 2 and 6. Also, instruct little kids to spit out toothpaste rather than swallow it, as young children are inclined to do.

Overall, fluoridation of community water supplies has been a tremendous success, having dramatically reduced tooth decay in both children and adults.

As for bone cancer, every year about 400 children and adolescents (boys and girls) in the U.S. are diagnosed with osteosarcoma, a rare disease. In 2006, Harvard researchers reported an association between fluoride in drinking water and the incidence of osteosarcoma in boys (not girls).

In a review of the more recent research, the American Cancer Society noted that the second part of the Harvard study, published in 2011, compared the fluoride levels in bones near tumors in people with osteosarcoma to levels in people with other types of bone tumors. No difference was seen between the fluoride levels in the two groups.

According to the ACS, two more recent studies compared the rates of osteosarcoma in areas with higher versus lower levels of fluoridation in Ireland and the United States. Neither one found an increased risk of the disease in areas with fluoridated water.

While this case isn't closed, so far we have no hard evidence supporting a link between fluoridation and bone cancer.

Andrew Weil, M.D.

Sources:
"Water Fluoridation and Cancer Risk," American Cancer Society, accessed April 28, 2014, http://www.cancer.org/cancer/cancercauses/othercarcinogens/athome/water-fluoridation-and-cancer-risk

"HHS issues final recommendation for community water fluoridation," U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, accessed April 28, 2015, http://www.hhs.gov/news/press/2015pres/04/20150427a.html

Creative Commons License Some Rights Reserved Creative Commons Copyright Notice
A portion of the original material created by Weil Lifestyle on DrWeil.com (specifically, all question and answer-type articles in the Dr. Weil Q&A Library) is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License.